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'''Muhammed Celâleddîn-i Rumi''' ([[Farsça]]: {{Dil|fa|جلال‌الدین محمد بلخى}}), veya kısaca bilinen adıyla '''Mevlânâ''' ({{Dil|fa|مولانا}}, "efendimiz", 30 Eylül 1207&nbsp;- 17 Aralık 1273), 13. yüzyılda yaşamış TürkFars<ref name="EI">Ritter, H.; Bausani, A. "ḎJ̲alāl al-Dīn Rūmī b. Bahāʾ al-Dīn Sulṭān al-ʿulamāʾ Walad b. Ḥusayn b. Aḥmad Ḵh̲aṭībī." Encyclopaedia of Islam. Edited by: P. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel and W.P. Heinrichs. Brill, 2007. Brill Online. Excerpt: "known by the sobriquet Mewlānā, persian poet and founder of the Mewlewiyya order of dervishes"</ref><ref>Franklin D. Lewis, "Rumi: Past and Present, East and West: The life, Teaching and poetry of Jalal Al-Din Rumi", Oneworld Publication Limited, 2008 p. 9: "How is that a Persian boy born almost eight hundred years ago in Khorasan, the northeastern province of greater Iran, in a region that we identify today as in Asia, but was considered in those days as part of the greater Persian cultural sphere, wound up in central Anatolia on the receding edge of the Byzantine cultural sphere"</ref> Sünni<ref>{{Kaynak|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=1y-hxhLSWsEC&pg=PA48|title=The Complete Idiot's Guide to Rumi Meditations|page=48|publisher=Penguin Group|}}</ref> Müslüman şair, fâkih, âlim, ilahiyatçı ve Sufi mutasavvıf.<ref>Annemarie Schimmel, "The Mystery of Numbers", Oxford University Press, 7 Nisan, 1994. s. 51: "These examples are taken from the Persian mystic Rumi's work, not from Chinese, but they express the yang-yin{{sic}} relationship with perfect lucidity."</ref> Kendisinin etkisi yalnızca bir ulusla veya etnik kimlikle sınırlı kalmayarak pek çok farklı millete ulaştı; manevi mirası [[Farslar|İranlılar]], [[Tacikler]], [[Türkler]], [[Kapadokyalı Rumlar|Rumlar]], [[Peştunlar]], [[Orta Asya]]lı Müslümanlar ve [[Güney Asya]]lı Müslümanlar tarafından benimsenerek yedi yüzyılı aşkın bir süredir takdirle karşılandı.<ref name="Nasr1">Seyyed Hossein Nasr, "Islamic Art and Spirituality", Suny Press, 1987. s. 115: "Jalal al-Din was born in a major center of Persian culture, Balkh, from Persian speaking parents, and is the product of that Islamic Persian culture which in the 7th/13th century dominated the 'whole of the eastern lands of Islam and to which present day Persians as well as Turks, Afghans, Central Asian Muslims and the Muslims of the Indo-Pakistani subcontinent are heir. It is precisely in this world that the sun of his spiritual legacy has shone most brillianty during the past seven centuries. The father of Jalal al-Din, Muhammad ibn Husayn Khatibi, known as Baha al-Din Walad and entitled Sultan al-'ulama', was an outstanding Sufi in Balkh connected to the spiritual lineage of Najm al-Din Kubra."</ref> Şiirleri dünya çapında onlarca dile birçok kez çevrildi ve zaman zaman çeşitli farklı biçimlere dönüştürüldü. Kıtaları aşan etkisi sayesinde günümüzde ABD'de "en çok tanınan ve en çok satan şair" hâline geldi.<ref name="BBC-Haviland">{{Haber kaynağı|url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7016090.stm|title=The roar of Rumi—800 years on|author=Charles Haviland|publisher=BBC News|date=30 Eylül 2007|accessdate=30 Eylül 2007}}</ref><ref>{{Web kaynağı | url = http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20140414-americas-best-selling-poet | title = Why is Rumi the best-selling poet in the US? | last = Ciabattari | publisher = BBC News | first = Jane | date = 21 Ekim 2014 | website = | access-date = 2016-08-22 | arşivurl = http://web.archive.org/web/20180116061022/http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20140414-americas-best-selling-poet | arşivtarihi = 16 Ocak 2018}}</ref><ref>{{Haber kaynağı|url=http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,356133,00.html|title=Rumi Rules!|last=Tompkins|first=Ptolemy|date=2002-10-29|newspaper=Time|issn=0040-781X|access-date=22 Ağustos 2016}}</ref>
 
Mevlânâ eserlerini çoğunlukla Farsça kaleme aldı ancak bunun yanı sıra nadiren Türkçe, Arapça ve Rumca kullanmayı da tercih etti.<ref>Δέδες, Δ. 1993. Ποιήματα του Μαυλανά Ρουμή. Τα Ιστορικά 10.18–19: 3–22.</ref><ref>Meyer, G. 1895. Die griechischen Verse in Rabâbnâma. Byzantinische Zeitschrift 4: 401–411.</ref><ref>{{Web kaynağı|url=http://www.tlg.uci.edu/~opoudjis/Play/rumiwalad.html|title=Greek Verses of Rumi & Sultan Walad|work=uci.edu|date=22 April 2009|deadurl=yes|archiveurl=https://archive.is/20120805175317/http://www.tlg.uci.edu/~opoudjis/Play/rumiwalad.html|archivedate=5 Ağustos 2012}}</ref><ref name="Annemarie Schimmel"/><ref name="Franklin Lewis"/> Konya'da yazdığı ''[[Mesnevî (Mevlânâ Celâleddîn-i Rûmî)|Mesnevî]]'', Fars diliyle yazılmış en büyük şiirlerden biri olarak kabul gördü.<ref>Louis Gardet, "Religion and Culture" in ''The Cambridge History of Islam—Part VIII: Islamic Society and Civilization'', edited by P. M. Holt, Ann K. S. Lambton, Bernard Lewis, Cambridge University Press (1977), p. 586: "It is sufficient to mention 'Aziz al-Din Nasafi, Farid al-Din 'Attar and Sa'adi, and above all Jalal al-Din Rumi, whose Mathnawi remains one of the purest literary glories of Persia"</ref><ref name="C.E. Bosworth p. 391">C.E. Bosworth, "Turkmen Expansion towards the west" in UNESCO History of Humanity, Volume IV, titled "From the Seventh to the Sixteenth Century", UNESCO Publishing / Routledge, p. 391: "While the Arabic language retained its primacy in such spheres as law, theology and science, the culture of the Seljuk court and secular literature within the sultanate became largely Persianized; this is seen in the early adoption of Persian epic names by the Seljuk rulers (Qubād, Kay Khusraw and so on) and in the use of Persian as a literary language (Turkmen must have been essentially a vehicle for everyday speech at this time). The process of Persianization accelerated in the 13th century with the presence in Konya of two of the most distinguished refugees fleeing before the Mongols, Bahā' al-Dīn Walad and his son Mawlānā Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī, whose Mathnawī, composed in Konya, constitutes one of the crowning glories of classical Persian literature."</ref> Eserleri yazıldığı orijinal hâliyle günümüzde hâlen [[Antik İran|Büyük İran]]'da ve Farsça konuşulan yerlerde okunmaktadır.<ref>{{Haber kaynağı|url=http://www.rferl.org/content/Interview_Many_Americans_Love_RumiBut_They_Prefer_He_Not_Be_Muslim/2122973.html|title=Interview: 'Many Americans Love Rumi...But They Prefer He Not Be Muslim'|date=2010-08-09|newspaper=RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty|language=English|access-date=2016-08-22}}</ref><ref>{{Web kaynağı | url = http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/LH14Ak01.html | title = Interview: A mystical journey with Rumi | last = | first = | date = | website = Asia Times | publisher = | access-date = 2016-08-22 | arşivengelli = evet}}</ref> Eserlerinin çevirileri ise özellikle Türkiye, Azerbaycan, ABD ve Güney Asya'da yaygın bir şekilde okunmaktadır.<ref>{{Web kaynağı | url = http://www.omifacsimiles.com/brochures/divan.html | title = Dîvân-i Kebîr Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī | last = | first = | date = | website = OMI – Old Manuscripts & Incunabula | publisher = | access-date = 2016-08-22 | arşivurl = http://web.archive.org/web/20160304001226/http://www.omifacsimiles.com/brochures/divan.html | arşivtarihi = 4 Mart 2016}}</ref>
 
Babası, "alimlerin sultânı" unvanı ile tanınmış, Muhammed Bahâeddin Veled; büyükbabası, Ahmed Hatîbî oğlu Hüseyin Hatîbî'dir. Babasına Sultânü'l-Ulemâ unvanının verilmesini kaynaklar Türk gelenekleri ile açıklamaktadır.<ref>Midhat Bahari BEYTUR, Divan-ı Kebir'den Seçme Şiirler, Milli Eğitim Basımevi, İstanbul, 1965, C.l/s.17</ref> Etnik kökeni tartışmalı olup; [[Fars]]<ref>[[Annemarie Schimmel]], ''The Triumphal Sun: A Study of the Works of Jalaloddin Rumi'', SUNY Press, 1993, S. 193: ''“Rumi’s mother tongue was Persian, but he had learned during his stay in Konya, enough Turkish and Greek to use it, now and then, in his verse”''
* Franklin Lewis, ''Rumi Past and Present, East and West'', Oneworld Publications, 2000, S. 9: ''“How is it that a Persian boy born almost eight hundred years ago in Khorasan, the northeastern province of greater Iran, in a region that we identify today as Central Asia, but was considered in those days as part of the greater Persian cultural sphere, wound up in Central Anatolia on the receding edge of the Byzantine cultural sphere, in which is now Turkey, some 1500 miles to the west?”''
* 1)Speros Vryonis,"The Turkish State and History", Aristide D Caratzas Pub; 2 Sub edition (September 1992), p.51: "Djalal al-Din Rumi, the great Persian mystic and poet who lived most of his life in Konya is said to have had a very vivid and violent opinion of the nature of the Turkmen nomads of the Rum sultanate: “There is a well known story that the sheikh Salah al-Din one day hired some Turkmen workmen to build the walls of his garden. "Effendi Salah al-Din", said the master (Rumi), "you must hire Greek workmen for this construction. It is for the work of demolition that Turkish workmen must be hired. For the construction of the world is special to the Greeks, and the demolition of this same world is reserved for the Turks. When God created the universe, he first made the carefree infidels. He gave them a long life and considerable force in such a fashion...that in the manner of paid workmen they constructed the earthly world. They erected numerous cities and mountain fortresses...so that after centuries these constructions served as models to the men of recent times. But divine predestination has disposed of affairs in such a way that little by little the constructions become ruins. He created the people of the Turks in order to demolish, without respect or pity, all the constructions which they see. They have done this and are still doing it. They shall continue to do it day in and day out until the Resurrection!"”
* 2)Franklin Lewis: "On the question of Rumi's multilingualism (pages 315-17), we may still say that he spoke and wrote in Persian as a native language, wrote and conversed in Arabic as a learned "foreign" language and could at least get by at the market in Turkish and Greek (although some wildly extravagant claims have been made about his command of Attic Greek, or his native tongue being Turkish") (Lewis 2008:xxi). (Franklin Lewis, "Rumi, "Past and Present, East and West: The Life, Teachings and Poetry of Jalal al-Din Rumi", One World Publication Limited, 2008). Franklin Lewis on Turkish scholar and cultural ambassador Onder: "There, we can only surmise that his cultural jingoism represents a conscious effort to rob Rumi of his Persian and Iranian heritage, and claim him for Turkish literature, ethnicity and nationalism") (Lewis 2008:549). (Franklin Lewis, "Rumi, "Past and Present, East and West: The Life, Teachings and Poetry of Jalal al-Din Rumi", One World Publication Limited, 2008) Franklin D. Lewis, "Rumi: Past and Present, East and West: The life, Teaching and poetry of Jalal Al-Din Rumi", Oneworld Publication Limited, 2008 pg 9: "How is that a Persian boy born almost eight hundred years ago in Khorasan, the northeastern province of greater Iran, in a region that we identify today as Central Asia, but was considered in those days as part of the greater Persian cultural sphere, wound up in central Anatolia on the receding edge of the Byzantine cultural sphere". Franklin Lewis:”Living among Turks, Rumi also picked up some colloquial Turkish.”(Franklin Lewis, "Rumi, "Past and Present, East and West: The Life, Teachings and Poetry of Jalal al-Din Rumi", One World Publication Limited, 2008, pg 315). "Rumi also composed a thirteen-line poem with the refrain, "you are the Agapos," from the Greek word agape, meaning 'you are the beloved'. These poems have bits of demotic Greek; these have been identified and translated in French along with some Greek verses of Sultan Valad"(.”(Franklin Lewis, "Rumi, "Past and Present, East and West: The Life, Teachings and Poetry of Jalal al-Din Rumi", One World Publication Limited, 2008, pg 315))
* 3)Ritter, H.; Bausani, A. "ḎJ̲alāl al- Dīn Rūmī b. Bahāʾ al-Dīn Sulṭān al-ʿulamāʾ Walad b. Ḥusayn b. Aḥmad Ḵh̲aṭībī ." Encyclopaedia of Islam. Edited by: P. Bearman , Th. Bianquis , C.E. Bosworth , E. van Donzel and W.P. Heinrichs. Brill, 2007. Brill Online. Excerpt: "known by the sobriquet Mewlānā, persian poet and founder of the Mewlewiyya order of dervishes"
* Wayne Teasdale , “The Mystic Heart: Discovering a Universal Spirituality in the World's Religions”, New World Library, Mar 9, 2001. Pg 224: “'''The Persian mystic''' Rumi, one of the greatest Islamic poet sages..”
* Seyyed Hossein Nasr, “The Garden of Truth: The Vision and Promise of Sufism, Islam's Mystical Tradition”, Harper Collins, Sep 18, 2007. Pg 204:”'''Of Persian origin''' and born in Balkh, Rumi, the poet whose poems now are the most widely sold in America, spent the last forty years of his life in Konya in Anatolia.”
* T. Tymieniecka,” Islamic Philosophy and Occidental Phenomenology on the Perennial Issue of Microcosm and Macrocosm”, Springer, Aug 29, 2006. “The story of true love is so sweet that it not only cannot be narrated in one paper, but, '''as the Persian mystic Rumi''' says: 26 However much we describe and explain love, When we come to love we are ashamed of it.”,
* A. Avery, G., A Reynolds, K, "Representations of Childhood Death", Palgrave Macmillan, 2000. pg 158: "his free translations of the work of the Persian mystic Rumi".
* Jelaluddin Rumi, Andrew Harvey, Lekha Singh,"Call to Love: In the Rose Garden with Rumi", Sterling Publishing Company, Sep 1, 2007 - 112 pages. Backcover: “'''The Persian mystic Rumi''', who lived and wrote in thirteenth-century Turkey, has become the most widely read poet in America today.
* Mariam Naseem, "Not Without My Son: As Told to Lee Gittler Steup", AuthorHouse, Jan 19, 2010.
pg 26:"I finish this chapter with the words of the oldest and greatest Persian poet, Rumi,"
[[google:"Rumi+persian+poet"&btnG=Search+Books&tbm=bks&tbo=1#hl.3Den.26tbo.3D1.26tbm.3Dbks.26sclient.3Dpsy-ab.26q.3D.22Persian.2Bpoet.2BRumi.22.26oq.3D.22Persian.2Bpoet.2BRumi.22.26gs_l26gs l.3Dserp.3...8097.10644.0.10813.19.19.0.0.0.0.156.1417.16j3.19.0.efrsh..0.0...1.9GrMo9DB8sQ.26pbx.3D1.26bav.3Don.2.2Cor.r_gcr gc.r_pwr pw.r_qfr qf..26fp.3D9a8fbacd776db0ec.26biw.3D1536.26bih.3D718|https://www.google.com/search?q=%22Rumi+persian+poet%22&btnG=Search+Books&tbm=bks&tbo=1#hl=en&tbo=1&tbm=bks&sclient=psy-ab&q=%22Persian+poet+Rumi%22&oq=%22Persian+poet+Rumi%22&gs_l=serp.3...8097.10644.0.10813.19.19.0.0.0.0.156.1417.16j3.19.0.efrsh..0.0...1.9GrMo9DB8sQ&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&fp=9a8fbacd776db0ec&biw=1536&bih=718]]
* N. Hanif, "Biographical Encyclopedia of Sufis",Volume 3 of Biographical encyclopaedia of Sufis",Sarup & Sons, 2000. pg 18: "Shah Abdul Latif had an unflinching faith in the great Persian poet Rumi"
* AC Hunsberger, "Nasir Khusraw, the Ruby of Badakhshan: A Portrait of the Persian Poet, Traveller and Philosopher",I.B.Tauris, 2003. page xiii: "If Nasir Khusraw is less well-known today, even in Iran, than other Persian poets such as Sa'di, Khayyam, Rumi or Hafiz, other travel chroniclers and historians such as Ibn Battuta or Ibn Khaldun"
* Cyril Glassé, Huston Smith, "The New Encyclopedia of Islam", Rowman Altamira, 2003. pg 235:"He was of Persian origin from Balkh, but left at an early age with his father Baha' ad-Din Walad,a scholar who had disagreements with the rulers".
* Charles Dudley Warner, "A Library of the World's Best Literature - Ancient and Modern - Vol.XXXII (Forty-Five Volumes); Rumi-Schrer",Cosimo, Inc., 2008. pg 2487: "The appelation Rumi, or Syrian, is given to the Persian poet Jalal al-Din because most of his life was passed at Iconium in Rumi or Asia Minor"
* R Kane, "The Significance of Free Will", Oxford University Press, 1996, pg 3: "There is a disputation [that will continue] till mankind are raised from the dead between the Necessitarians and the partisans of Free Will. —Jalalu'ddin Rumi, twelfth-century Persian poet "
* Fayeq Oweis, "Encyclopedia of Arab American Artists",ABC-CLIO, 2008.
pg 121: "The Post-Apollo Press has also published one of the most important scholarly studies on the great spiritual master and Persian poet Jalaluddin Rumi (1207-1273) and his life and work"
 
* Edward E. Curtis, "Encyclopedia of Muslim-American history",Infobase Publishing, 2010. pg 503:"Rumi, a Persian poet and theologian, inspired movement in the 13th century Turkey.."
* Salma Khadra Jayyusi, Manuela Marín, "The Legacy of Muslim Spain",
BRILL, 1992. pg 545:"Mystical poets like the Persian poet Rumi were to reach new extremes of delicacy and preciosity in seeing in the intimate union of the rose (gol) and sugar (shekar) .."
 
* Thom Cavalli, "Alchemical Psychology: Old Recipes for Living in a New World", Penguin, Mar 1, 2002. pg 260: "I have often quoted the great Persian poet Rumi.."
[http://books.google.com/books?id=cotAlvWP4v8C&pg=PT260&lpg=PT260&dq=%22persian+poet+rumi%22&source=bl&ots=xGZ8Hqcn0t&sig=RyV8Lr7ib4pzlbehefjH1lfDErU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=QfooUKXrMOXo0gHXpYGoDg&ved=0CE4Q6AEwBTgK#v=onepage&q=%22persian%20poet%20rumi%22&f=false]
* Rumi, Ehsan Yarshater, Hasan Javadi and A. J. Arberry , "Mystical Poems of Rumi",
University Of Chicago Press (April 15, 2009) . " Front Matter: "... Persian mystical poet Maulänä.."
 
* Wayne Teasdale and the Dalai Lama, "The mystical heart: Discovering a Universal Spirituality in the World's Religions", New World Library, 2001. pg 222: "The Persian mystic Rumi, one of the great Islamic poet sages, comments.."
* Roger Housden , "Ten Poems to Change Your Life",Random House Digital, Inc., 2001. pg 14: "Eight hundred years earlier, the Persian mystic Rumi said:.."